Simple Agreement For Future Equity

SAFE agreements have a lot to offer. But what benefits the startup, such as the lack of standardization, can also hurt the startup if the contract is not developed and negotiated in a professional and strategic manner. If you are a start-up and looking for alternative and creative ways to find investors, contact Mohsen Parsa today. To understand what a SAFE is, it is also important to know what it is not. It is not a debt instrument. Nor are they common shares or convertible bonds. However, SAFe`s convertible bonds are similar in that they can provide equity to the investor in a future preferred share cycle and include valuation caps or discounts. However, unlike convertible bonds, FAS has no interest and no specific maturity date and, in fact, can never be triggered to convert SAFE into equity. The exact conditions of a SAFE vary.

However, the basic mechanics[1] are that the investor makes available to the company a certain amount of financing at the time of signing. In return, the investor will later receive shares in the company in connection with specific contractual liquidity events. The main trigger is usually the sale of preferred shares by the company, usually as part of a future fundraising cycle. Unlike direct equity acquisition, shares are not valued at the time of SAFE signing. Instead, investors and the company negotiate the mechanism with which future shares will be issued and defer actual valuation. These conditions generally include an entity valuation cap and/or a discount on the valuation of the shares at the time of triggering. In this way, the SAFE investor participates above the company between the signing of safe (and the financing provided) and the triggering event. SAFE is a kind of warrant that gives investors the right to obtain shares of the company, usually preferred shares if and when there is a future valuation event (i.e. when the company collects “cheap” equity next year, is acquired or it files an IPO). If you have questions about simple future investment agreements or other equity financing issues, lawyers from Parker McCay`s Corporate and Commercial Lending Departments will be available. For a growing start-up, the company will probably find more money.

As a start-up investor, I`m not interested in being reimbursed. The risk associated with a start-up is high, so I hope that in the event of a high risk, there will be a potential for a strong upward trend. That is why I would like my SAFE to be “converted” to equity at a later date. Basically, as soon as someone decides to invest in the company in a “price cycle”, my SAFE becomes shares of the company. At the end of 2013, Y Combinator published the Simple Agreement for Future Equity (“SAFE”) investment instrument as an alternative to convertible debt. [2] This investment vehicle is now known in the U.S. and Canada because of its simplicity and low transaction costs. However, as use is increasingly frequent, concerns have arisen about its potential impact on entrepreneurs, particularly where several SAFE investment cycles take place prior to a private equity cycle[4] and the potential risks to un accredited crowdfunding investors who could invest in the SAFes of companies that realistically never receive venture capital financing and therefore never generate equity in equity.

[5] In addition, a SAFE may be on hold indefinitely, which would prevent the investor from making a profit from the investment. Since FASCs should only be converted in the event of specific events, an investor should analyze the risk that events will not occur in light of the company`s circumstances. If an entity generates enough capital to not require additional rounds of financing in